Used Lexus Cars

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Lexus is one of the youngest major automobile brands in the world, but its youth has not slowed its rapid expansion into US markets historically dominated by Cadillac and Lincoln. Lexus was launched by Toyota in 1989 as an upmarket luxury brand. At the time, Toyota nor any other Japanese or Korean automaker had established premium products for the US market. At the time of Lexus' launch, Acura was the new brand on the block. The Toyota Chairman at the time, Eiji Toyoda, saw an opportunity for his company to take advantage of its reputation as a manufacturer of high-quality cars and apply it to the luxury market.

Today, Lexus markets a wide range of used vehicles, including four luxury sedans (LS, GS, ES, IS), the SC luxury coupe, three luxury sport utility vehicles (LX, GX, RX) and three luxury hybrids (LS, GS, RX).

Lexus' History

The seeds of Lexus were planted in August of 1983 when Toyoda decided it was time to enter the luxury market. Toyota took an innovative approach and rather than centering its US operations in Detroit, Toyota chose to base its design team in California. By 1985, the first Lexus LS 400 prototype was built. Over the next three years, the LS would undergo rigorous testing and review alongside the development of a smaller companion car, the Lexus ES. In January 1989, the LS 400 and the ES 250 were unveiled at the Detroit Auto Show. Lexus' success becomes immediately apparent. In 1990 the LS 400 is named one of the 10 Best by Car and Driver, named Best Imported Car of the Year by the Motoring Press Association (MPA), and awarded the top spot for initial quality by J.D. Power and Associates. By 1999 Lexus would sell its millionth in the US; a large number of those sales taken away from domestic luxury automakers. Over the next decade, Lexus would continue to introduce and improve its products, collecting numerous awards for quality and excellence along the way.

Lexus would be an early entrant into the luxury sport utility business with the introduction of the LX 450 in 1996. Lincoln would follow shortly thereafter and introduce the Lincoln Navigator in 1998, and Cadillac would wait two more years to enter the upmarket Used SUV fray.