Kelley Blue Book ® - 2001 Mercury Villager Overview

Vehicle Overview from Kelley Blue Book

KBB.com 2001 Mercury Villager Overview

Body

Another true mini in the minivan world, the Quest—and its twin the Mercury Villager—share one of the oldest minivan platforms now on the market. Introduced in 1993, the Quest received a major facelift in 1996, but its skeleton can still trace its roots back to the original '93 model. This will probably be the last year for the Quest. No plans have yet been announced for a replacement.

The Quest actually has a decent overall cargo volume that is somewhat diminished by the mechanics of its third-row seat. It is not removable, nor does it fold flush or hide-away in the floor. Instead, it flips forward and slides to the front of the cabin via a set of tracks. The center captain's chairs can be removed, with some effort, allowing the third seat to slide all the way to the backs of the driver and passenger seats. Even when pushed to its forward-most position, the seat itself still takes up valuable cargo space. With the third seat in place, the Quest officially can carry seven people, but if passenger comfort is your goal, it is better suited to carrying 4 and their luggage. The third seat gets low marks for comfort and is not recommended for long trips.

The Quest does have dual-sliding doors, but they must be manually operated. There is an optional video screen to keep the kids' attention and a drop-down fish-eye mirror for when kids get restless. The dash is well laid out, attractive and functional, as is the interior. Fit and finish are excellent.

On the road, the Quest drives much like a car. Unfortunately it's not a sports car. The suspension floats and the steering is devoid of feeling. The V6 is strong and pulls the Quest with ease, attaining an EPA city/highway rating of 17/23-again average for the class. There is very little engine noise and moderate tire and wind noise.

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