Kelley Blue Book ® - 2004 Lincoln Navigator Overview

Vehicle Overview from Kelley Blue Book

KBB.com 2004 Lincoln Navigator Overview

Body
Theres Nothing Subtle About It

Theres nothing quite like a big, chrome-covered SUV to get peoples attention. Whether its on the road or in front of the country club gates, the Lincoln Navigator certainly possesses the size and style to command everyones attention. Fresh from its makeover last year, the Navigator sails into 2004 with only a few improvements.

Compared to the original Navigator, the new model is more angular, with a broad chrome grille flanked by larger, flush-mounted headlamps. Along the sides, youll find optional running boards that electrically extend out whenever the doors are opened. 18-inch 8-spoke chrome wheels and wide tires fill in the wheel wells and new, larger side-view mirrors incorporate puddle lights that project light downward toward the ground.

The Navigator's frame (the steel rails the body sits upon) has been redesigned to allow the bumper height to correspond with that of an ordinary passenger car. This important safety measure ensures the Navigator will not suffer nor inflict great damage in a fender-bender type collision with a vehicle of lesser stature. At the rear of the frame, an independent suspension improves handling as well as off-road ability. With each axle free to move independently of the other, the Navigator's ride, handling and stability is greatly improved.

Under the hood, a willing 5.4-liter V8 eagerly awaits your command to unleash its 300 horsepower, which is important because with the Navigator's size and weight, you will probably find yourself making this request often. Not that the new Navigator is slow, it's just not blindingly quick; and for this class of vehicle, that is perfectly acceptable. The improved ride and impressive road feel transmitted through the steering wheel are the real stories here, providing surprisingly firm and accurate feedback to the driver. For 2004, the optional AdvanceTrac traction control system now includes Roll Stability Control.

The Navigators interior is one of the best youll find in the Lincoln fleet and should be considered the benchmark for all future Lincolns. One look and you are instantly reminded of the classic 1962 Continental, a car whose clean, straightforward design still elicits an aura of elegant simplicity and high desirability. Beginning with the Navigator's dashboard, you will notice a wide satin-silver finished panel that covers the navigation and audio unit; below it, satin silver finish also covers the heating and ventilation controls as well as the center console. On either side of the center panel, two hooded rectangular pods face the driver and passenger, punctuated by a thick strip of genuine American Walnut that continues over the doors and center console. Bright white LED lights illuminate every control imaginable, including those on the handsomely designed steering wheel.

The seats, door panels and trim pieces are all covered in matching textured leather that is of the highest quality. The seats themselves are a delight to sit in and feature multiple adjustments that allow just about anyone to get cozy. You will find excellent back and thigh support, not only from the front, but from the center and third-row seats as well. Speaking of third-row seats, the Navigator has a seat you will love; an optional electrically-operated folding split-rear seat that disappears to create a perfectly flush floor. Opt for the optional electrically operated tailgate, and you may never again have to soil your hands before having the valet load your golf clubs.

There are three trim levelsLuxury, Premium and Ultimate. As the name implies, the Ultimate will be loaded to the gills and will probably be the first choice of those who don't like to waste time checking off option boxes. If a luxury SUV is in your future, you absolutely must test the new Navigator; it's simply the best luxury vehicle to come out of Lincoln in years.

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