Kelley Blue Book ® - 2002 Ford Taurus Overview

Vehicle Overview from Kelley Blue Book

KBB.com 2002 Ford Taurus Overview

Body
Finding Comfort in a Familiar Face

The Taurus, and its stable mate the Mercury Sable, represent Ford's bread and butter family sedans. Always a strong seller for Ford, the Taurus even once managed to steal the coveted "Best Selling Car in America" title from Honda. The Taurus' design has proved so popular with Americans that it requires only occasional cosmetic freshening to keep it competitive. If you are looking for a time-tested, conservatively-styled American car offering a good amount of content at an affordable price, the Taurus may be right up your alley.

The Taurus's interior is filled with numerous functional items such as cup holders, storage bins and steering wheel mounted controls. The dash has a nice symmetrical look at first glance though you'll notice how the radio and ventilation controls are bundled together in a single center dash panel with no clear separation between the two. The design is actually easier to decipher at night, with the radio buttons backlit in green and the ventilation controls in orange. While the Taurus provides plenty of legroom for four adults, the thick plastic windshield pillars and inward sloping rear pillars create a cozy feeling for the passengers, which is especially noticeable in the backseat when sitting three abreast. The adjustable foot pedals and power driver's seat make it possible for just about anyone to find a comfortable driving position, though the driver's seat could do with more lumbar support. The fold down rear seat allows you to expand the Taurus's cargo space and also offers another way of loading bulky items that won't fit through the trunk's narrow opening.

We chose the optional 24-valve 3.0-liter DuratecV6 engine to power our Taurus. This engine, which produces 200-horsepower, has no problem moving the Taurus in both city and highway driving conditions. It's 24-valve configuration helps the engine to breathe better, producing more power while consuming less fuel. On mildly uneven pavement, the Taurus telegraphs some vibration into the cabin but on smoother pavement, its ride is comfortable and relaxed. You may find the steering is a bit over-assisted but not to the point where you lose your connection to the road.

Overall, the Taurus and Sable are still strong contenders in the family sedan field; they offer room, power and a long and solid history of faithful service.

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