The Audi TT is a two-door, 2+2 compact sports coupe and a two-door, two-passenger compact sports roadster. The Audi TT is a compact sports car which has been available in North America since 1998. The vehicle was initially based on the Golf platform, and had roughly the same exterior dimensions and power train options as the Volkswagen hatch, with the addition of Quattro all-wheel drive. The Quattro’s unique egg shape and excellent driving characteristics quickly made it a popular vehicle amongst those looking for something a little different when it came a compact vehicle.

The 2009 Audi TT rides on a new platform that replaced that of the previous generation in 2006. The new design of the TT trades in some of the older model’s ovals for a more elongated, purposeful appearance that meshes well with overall Audi styling cues. The vehicle now has a coupe look to it, and the roadster version of the TT has straighter, cleaner lines as well. Both versions of the car can be ordered with either a 200 horsepower turbocharged 2.0 liter 4-cylinder, or a 3.2 liter V6 which makes 250 horsepower and 236 lb-ft of torque. A 6-speed manual transmission is available with the V6, but all versions of the 2.0 can only be equipped with a 6-speed semi-automatic transmission. Quattro is optional on the front-wheel drive base model, and standard on the 3.2

The TT uses Audi’s magnetically controlled suspension in order to change the stiffness of its suspension based on driving conditions, providing control when it is needed and comfort when it is desired. The TT can be ordered with either 17 or 18-inch wheels, and while the larger rims provide greater grip and traction, they also sacrifice a small amount of smoothness. The TT is reasonably fun to drive, but the heavily front-wheel drive biased Quattro system installed in both the coupe and the roadster subtracts a bit from the sports car feel. That being said, the TT handles well and corners like the small vehicle that it is, with a minimum of body roll or traction loss. The 3.2 liter engine provides a quicker throttle response, as it does not have to wait for the turbo to catch up like the 4-cylinder, but both motors provide more than enough power to give the TT an engaging driving experience.

The cockpit of the TT feels more spacious that would normally be expected from a sports car of this size, and the various controls for the stereo and air conditioning are well placed and unobtrusive. The roadster is easier to enter than the coupe, with both vehicles suffering somewhat from a low seating position. The high quality leather seats and trim really help to make the TT feel like it should cost much more than it actually does, and while the rear seat might be too small for anyone older than ten years of age, it does make a useful second trunk.

The Audi TT should definitely be on the shopping list of any buyer in the market for a compact sports car or small convertible. The all-wheel drive makes it a practical vehicle for all climates, and while the passenger capacity may be limited, with the top down or the pedal to the floor this complaint quickly becomes trivial.